How To Use a Sling

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Video Transcript

(00:00):
So I'm gonna do a real quick down and dirty on how to use a sling. So I've got our T.REX Sling right here. It is bound to the weapon using one of the included shock cord, little retainers that I have positioned here on the handguard. So once the sling is deployed just like so, what I'm going to do is put it on around my neck. Now, from here, the sling is being held to you. Sling holds rifles to the body. It's not bad. I can shoot. I can transition with it simply on my neck. Although it does mean that the rifle is a little more loose to spin around and have a mind of its own while I'm going and doing things or going hands free, trying to do something with the hands. So if I want to keep the rifle held to me a little more effectively, I will simply take my support arm, swim it on through.

(00:46):
So now the sling is being retained more on my back, not off of my neck. What this allows me to do is when I transition to a handgun, the rifle is being much more held back here on my back versus being able to slide around in the front and do all kinds of stuff. If I wanna actually put this on my back, it's quite simple. My left arm will come through my support arm and back to my neck, my dominant arm now comes through. I grab the rail, move it around to my back. At which point I can tighten or loosen, I'm already tightened and I am set. And this is where you can adjust your sling to be really tight once you're in this position. And then you loosen it once you go back to your firing position.

(01:29):
Now as far as where the sling should be attached, I like attaching the sling here near the pistol grip and here closer to the upper receiver and the magwell. There's a couple reasons for that. If you attach your sling here to the end of the stock, which is very traditional the issue that you start to run into is as you're shooting and collapsing your stock over your shoulder in a confined space, as soon as I go to punch out, look what the sling is doing. It's not real mobile for real fast, high speed, dynamic type stuff. If I jerk my rifle to a high ready, I am now pulling this sling against my body or my kit. There's a lot of friction and I can get all bound up in the sling. So that's why I like having the sling position here. I normally actually attach it to this side of the gun so that I have free movement of my stock, retracting the gun over my shoulder, coming back onto the stock.

(02:25):
And my sling is always staying on my actual shoulder. It's not slipping down onto my plate carrier or onto my back. As far as attaching the sling here closer to the magwell there's pros and cons to doing this versus this. I like keeping the sling here closer to the magwell. So my hand out here is not getting caught by the sling itself when I'm manipulating my light, my laser, doing my reloads and all that good stuff. So this is how I have it positioned. I kind of get the best of both worlds of a single point—which I don't recommend unless you're using a sub gun—but it does give you freedom of movement and a two point where I can actually secure the rifle to my body a little more effectively than a one point. So there's the down and dirty around your neck support arm goes through. Now, it's actually held to my body if I go to my back, like so.